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Medical] Jones, Mary A. Dixon.

Another Hitherto Undescribed Disease of the Ovaries and eight other titles.

Book

Medical Offprints by a Female Gynecological Surgeon
[Health issues]. Jones, Mary A. Dixon. Removal of the Uterine Appendages. Nine consecutive cases. Reprinted from The Medical Record, August 21, 1886. New York: Trow's Printing and Bookbinding Company, 1886.
12mo.; errata slip tipped in at the front; gray printed wrappers, stapled; ownership signature on upper right corner of upper wrapper; "Uterus, appendages of, excision of" written in pencil on upper wrapper; lower wrapper slightly torn; staples rusted.
Together with:
Jones, Mary A. Dixon. Removal of the Uterine Appendages. Five cases. Reprinted from the American Journal of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children, Vol. XXI., February, 1888. New York: William Wood & Co., 1888.
8vo.; blue printed wrappers, stapled; ink signature on upper wrapper, "W.A. Newman Dorland, M.D." and "88"; "Uterus, appendages of, excision of" written in pencil on upper wrapper with minor chips and tears.
Together with:
Jones, Mary A. Dixon. A Hitherto Undescribed Disease of the Ovary; Endothlioma changing to Angeioma and Hæmatoma. Reprinted from the New York Medical Journal for September 28, 1889.
12mo.; light brown printed wrappers, string-tied; "Ovary, Endothelioma" and "J.C. 2" written in pencil on upper wrapper; advertisement for New York Medical Journal printed on interior of lower wrapper.
Together with:
Jones, Mary A. Dixon. Another Hitherto Undescribed Disease of the Ovaries. Anomalous menstrual bodies. Reprinted from The New York Medical Journal for May 10 and 17, 1890.
12mo.; gray printed wrappers, string-tied; ownership signature on upper right corner of upper wrapper; "Ovary, Diseases of" written in pencil on upper wrapper, and in ink, "W.A. Newman Dorland" and "No. 101"; advertisement for New York Medical Journal printed on interior of lower wrapper.
Together with:
Jones, Mary A. Dixon. Diagnosis and Some of the Clinical Aspects of Gyroma and Endothelioma of the Ovary. Reprint from the Buffalo Medical and Surgical Journal, November 1892.
8vo.; beige printed wrappers, stapled; ownership signature ("J. Solis Cohen") on bottom edge of upper wrapper; "Ovary, Endothelioma" written in pencil on the upper wrapper; lower wrapper slightly darkened.
Together with:
Jones, Mary A. Dixon. Microscopical Studies in Pelvic Peritonitis. Reprinted from the Medical Record, May 28, 1892. New York: Trow Directory, Printing and Bookbinding Co., 1892.
12mo.; beige printed wrappers, disbound with stab holes at left margin; "18" stamped on upper wrapper; edges darkened.
Together with:
Jones, Mary A. Dixon. Carcinoma of the Pelvis. Reprinted from the Medical Record, March 11, 1893. New York: Trow Directory, Printing and Bookbinding Co., 1893.
12mo.; beige printed wrappers, stapled; "Pelvis, Tumors of, Malignant" written in pencil on upper wrapper.
Together with:
Jones, Mary A. Dixon. Laparatomy for Dieases Of Women From 1879 to 1889. Reprinted from the American Journal of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children, vol. XXXVI., No. 1, 1897.
8vo.; beige printed wrappers, disbound and repaired with tape; Initial "JBB" in pencil on upper wrapper.
Together with:
Jones, Mary A. Dixon. The Origin and Formation of Fibroid Tumors of the Uterus. Reprint from the Medical Record. September 14, 1901. New York: William Wood and Co., 1901.
12mo.; dark gray printed wrappers, disbound with stab holes at left margin; "Uterine, Tumors, Causes" and "JC 2" written in pencil on upper wrapper; covers darkened.
A collection of nine offprints on uterine cancer and other obstetric disorders written by renowned female surgeon Dr. Mary A. Dixon Jones. Each pamphlet was owned by one or two other doctors, whose names or initials in most cases appear on the upper wrappers. Most contain numerous diagrams and illustrations of the female reproductive system, as well as mortality statistics for certain procedures. Dr. Dixon Jones describes conditions she has encountered in her female patients and their treatment. In Removal of the Uterine Appendages, she describes five different circumstances in which it was necessary to remove a patient's ovaries. Though many conservative doctors frowned upon the procedure, arguing that a woman's fertility should be preserved at all costs, Dr. Dixon Jones felt strongly that the woman's health should be valued over her ability to bear children. She writes in Removal of the Uterine Appendages, "I welcome the operation. I look upon it as the means of saving many women who would otherwise be doomed to continued ill health or early death. I look back upon a practice of more than a dozen years, and know of many cases that I sincerely tried to help, and could have done it if I had known of this operation" (p. 19).
In Laparatomy for Diseases of Women from 1879 to 1889, Dr. Dixon Jones includes a chart listing surgeons' names, followed by the number and type of procedures performed and the percentage of deaths that resulted. However, she stresses that the high number of lives saved is important to keep in mind, as well as the fact that "some lives cannot be saved." About the nobility of the surgical profession, she writes:
The operations recorded in the accompanying table represent a tremendous amount of labor, of care, and of thoughtful consideration. It is a record of great and heroic work-of work that has blessed humanity, increased the sum of human happiness, and added many thousand years to human life…Surgeons, in perfecting their technique, have tried to secure every advantage for the safety of their patients…no body of men are more self-sacrificing, more generous, or labor more courageously or more faithfully for the good of humanity, and ofttimes without pay or recompense except, perhaps, blame and persecution for their excellent work. (p. 12)
Dr. Dixon Jones was herself no stranger to persecution; she was charged in 1890 with manslaughter after the death of one of her patients, but was acquitted. The Brooklyn Eagle, however, sensationalized the trial, depicting Dixon Jones as "an ambitious and unscrupulous social climber, a knife-happy, over-eager and irresponsible practitioner who forced unnecessary operations on unsuspecting women and used the specimens gleaned from their bodies to advance her reputation." They also hinted that the Women's Hospital, run by Dixon Jones, was guilty of financial wrongdoing. In response, Dixon Jones sued the newspaper for libel, but an all-male jury ruled against her and she was forced to close her practice as a result of the bad publicity.
Mary Amanda Dixon Jones (1828-1908) is credited for being the first doctor in America to perform a full hysterectomy in order to treat uterine myoma, a dangerous type of cancer. She began studying medicine in 1849 and worked as an apprentice under Dr. Henry F. Askew, president of the American Medical Association. From 1850 to 1852, she taught at Baltimore Female College. After getting married and raising three children, Dr. Dixon Jones relocated to New York without her family in order to pursue a more serious career in medicine. She enrolled at the Hygeio-Therapeutic Medical College and started her own private practice in Brooklyn after graduating in 1862.
Though she was earning more than many of her male counterparts, Dixon Jones was mystified by some of the complicated reproductive disorders she encountered in some of her patients, and decided to return to school, at the age of 44. She attended the Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania and then upon returning to New York, studied briefly under another famed woman surgeon, Mary Putnam Jacobi. From 1882 to 1891, she served as chief gynecologist at the Woman's Hospital of Brooklyn and earned a reputation for being a daring surgeon who was not afraid to try radical procedures to save women's lives. In 1888, she performed the first complete hysterectomy, removing the womb and a 17-lb uterine tumor from a patient, who was almost fully recovered two weeks after the operation.
Though she stopped seeing patients in 1892, Dr. Dixon Jones continued to publish articles on pathology in medical journals up until her death in 1908. In her lifetime, she wrote over 50 articles and served as associate editor of The American Journal of Surgery and Gynecology and the Woman's Medical Journal (Conduct Unbecoming a Woman: Medicine on Trial in Turn-of-the-Century Brooklyn, by Regina Morantz-Sanchez, Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 1999).         
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