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Arendt, Hannah and William Shawn.

LETTERS: Hannah Arendt-William Shawn Correspondence
1960-1972.

Letter(s)

Hannah Arendt Correspondence
with
William Shawn
1960-1972
Arendt, Hannah, et al. Hannah Arendt-William Shawn Correspondence, with related material. 1960-72.
Thirty-one typed letters from Hannah Arendt to William Shawn, together with his typed carbon and telegram responses; as well as several letters from readers regarding her piece on the Eichmann trial; five letters from Rita Vaughan at Harcourt, Brace and Jovanovich; and four letters from Mary McCarthy (the executor of Arendt's estate). Arendt's letters span from 1960 to 1972.  
Arendt and Shawn's relationship was a mixture of deep respect and formality; evidenced by the fact that throughout their years of correspondence and undeniable affection for each other, they never addressed each other by their first names; letters from Shawn always begin "Dear Dr. Arendt," and letters from Arendt, "Dear Mr. Shawn." The bulk of Arendt's correspondence is composed on her beautiful Riverside Drive, New York stationery. The typed black signature line at the close of each letter suggests she wrote them out long hand first or perhaps dictated them to an assistant. This literal underscoring of her signatures heightens the formality of her letters.
Also included are three lengthy typescripts; the first, a draft letter to the journalist Samuel Grafton, who was writing a piece for Look magazine in response to Arendt's book, Eichmann in Jerusalem; 13 leaves; undated; with inked annotations throughout. Grafton had sent Arendt a letter on September 13, 1963, in which he asks her thirteen questions about some of the arguments she raised in her book, and her reactions to the book's reception. Her typescript draft contains insights to her thinking and her writing process, the importance of which cannot be overestimated. For example, there was critical response to her choice of subtitle, "A Report on the Banality of Evil;" in her draft to Grafton, she expounds on her choice:
I meant that evil is not radical, going to the roots (radix), that it has no depth, and that for this reason it is so terribly difficult to think about it, since thinking, by definition, wants to reach the roots. Evil is a surface phenomenon, and instead of being radical, it is merely extreme. We resist evil by not being swept away by the surface of things, by stopping ourselves and beginning to think, that is, by reaching another dimension than the horizon of everyday life. In other words, the more superficial someone is, the more likely will he be to yield to evil. An indication of such superficiality is the use of clichés, and Eichmann, God knows, was a perfect example.
This typescript is working evidence of Arendt's pellucid intellect and the consideration she put into her work.
The second is a 27-page Xerox copy of an annotated typescript; unaddressed; dated June, 1964. It is a "Note to the Reader," for a revised and enlarged edition of Eichmann in Jerusalem, also including a "Postscript."
The third is a 19-page Xerox copy of an annotated typescript for Arendt's article on Bertoldt Brecht. In a letter to Shawn dated November 14, 1965, Arendt requests that he send her the first version of the Brecht article, for a lecture she was preparing to deliver at Cornell. Shawn replies on November 17, and encloses the Xeroxed typescript.  
The earliest letter in this collection is dated August 11, 1960; a short, innocuous-sounding note asking Shawn if she could report on the Eichmann trial for the New Yorker.  This early communication belies the importance of the trial - and the flood of reader responses Arendt's piece would prompt. She writes, "I am very tempted to attend the Eichmann-trial in Isreal. I am writing you today to inquire whether The New Yorker would be interested in one, possibly two articles on the case."
Eichmann's trial began on April 11, 1961 - in a letter from dated April 15, Arendt reveals, "The trial is interesting and the atmosphere in which it takes place is often fascinating. But it will take much longer than anybody expected; it goes very slowly and I guess I shall have to stay at least one week longer than I thought." In fact, the trial ended on August 15, 1961, and Eichmann was not executed until nearly 10 months later, on June 1, 1962; perhaps this is the reason that Arendt does not submit her piece to Shawn until September 13, 1962.
The piece was scheduled to be published in a series, beginning in the February 16, 1963 issue; and it was going to be followed by a book on the same subject. This piece touched a nerve in several readers, and the New Yorker received letters from many government offices and Jewish organizations; several such items are present here, for example from the Anti-Defamation League (who explained that readers would be distressed by the fact that, according to Arendt, not only did the Jews passively go to their graves, but also they assisted the Nazis in doing so); the Jewish Center Lecture Bureau; the Warsaw Ghetto Resistance Organization; and Theodore Kollek, the Prime Minister of Jerusalem. Kollek explains that he was "critical" of Arendt's piece; he encloses a newsletter titled, "Facts," from the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, that was written by Jacob Robinson, "an authority on international law and contemporary Jewish history."  
In spite of all of this attention, Arendt only comments on the response to the Eichmann trial once; in her March 13, 1963 letter, she remarks with sarcasm,
Letters I received here (sometimes copies of letters sent to you) make it very clear that Germans and German Jews are in complete agreement that something ought to be done about (against) me. Now the Jews know that the enemy no. 1 is not 'the German,' and the Germans agree that enemy no. 1 is not 'the Jew,' it is me. This, to be sure, is an exaggeration and your checking department would not let me get away with it.
There are also communications between Arendt and Shawn on other pieces she contributed to the New Yorker. These subjects include: Bertolt Brecht; Isak Dineson; "Truth and Politics"; Walter Benjamin; and "Civil Disobedience." These communications suggest - especially in the case of the Brecht article - that Shawn trusted Arendt implicitly and regarded her contributions to the New Yorker as groundbreaking, with the potential to affect not only the readership of the magazine, but society at large.
The Brecht article stemmed, it seems, from an informal conversation between Shawn and Arendt. On July 14, 1964, he writes to her and encloses an article on Brecht (not included here), imploring, "I hope that you will write about Brecht someday; what you would have to say about him would necessarily be new and valuable." Shawn wrote, ostensibly, to suggest that Arendt write a review about a book on Brecht; she explains, however, in her reply that a book review was not what she had in mind (March 28, 1965). With that letter, she enclosed an earlier piece that she had written on Brecht, to which Shawn replies, effusively, on April 6, 1965:
I have read your [Brecht] lecture. No piece of writing since 'Eichmann in Jerusalem' has affected me so deeply. What you say about Brecht, poets, poetry and politics is altogether new and stirring. I am filled with wonder that Brecht was as he was and that you are as you are. Would you be agreeable to the magazine's publishing the lecture as a Profile? True, this is an essay (and we don't publish essays), but, looked at from another point of view, it is a Profile, or what a Profile should, ideally, be: a partial portrait rather than a full portrait or a pile of facts or a biography. You have captured the essence. There are many ways of writing a Profile, and you have unwittingly written one your way.
Arendt's response to Shawn's suggestion is palpably ecstatic:
Your letter was a great joy. I wrote the piece originally out of anger with a friend of mine, Professor of German Literature, who thought he could throw Brecht out of the window because of his 'sins'; he was generous enough to let me address his students. I had to do it very quickly, mostly quoting from memory, and afterward had it retyped…I will try to put the thing into shape. At that moment, I will be grateful for your advice. (April 14, 1965)
Arendt is diligent in her fact-checking; in fact, in an early letter (February 16, 1963) she writes - in response to an inaccurate date in one of her articles - "…it confirms my conviction that no dates or facts provided by your checking department should be inserted unless they are checked and approved by me." This suggests that Arendt took full responsibility for what she was writing, and was concerned with how the facts included in her piece - and her reporting style - would be perceived by her readers. A letter regarding her Eichmann piece is a good example; it was dated September 30, 1962, 17 days after she sent her first draft. Arendt sends two pages of typed corrections she wanted to make to the piece, suggesting, "it may be useful to transfer these even now before your edited version will go into galleys. …If your checking assistants are having trouble, please let me know. I may be able to help - with books, articles, etc. Also: it may be difficult to get a complete set of trial proceedings, and while I am a bit reluctant to give my set, there is always a possibility to work at my home." Other good examples of her attention to fact-checking are seen in the letters dated October 13, 1966, April 19, 1969 and March 30, 1970.
Not only does she contribute to the New Yorker, but she also reads the pieces and comments on them. In several instances, she starts off a letter complimenting Shawn on his decision to include a piece in the magazine. "I forgot to tell you how deeply impressed I am by the piece of James Baldwin in the magazine. I have been hardly able to think of anything else ever since I read it" (November 21, 1962). On July 21, 1967, she wrote, "I am afraid I did not tell you how much I admired the piece on Vietnam by Jonathan Schell. Nothing else I read has the same immediacy," and a marginal notation by Shawn reveals that he sent this excerpt to Schell.  Arendt continues, "God knows the message must have spread by now that one of the worst fates that can befall a people is to be liberated by us. Compared with this nylon-concentration camp the establishment in Gurs (France) was sheer luxury." On April 7, 1969: "May I also tell you how delighted I was when I read Mr. Wald's speech in the magazine. I think this was by far the most enlightened statement on the student unrest." One letter - June 8, 1964 - is a series of compliments about various articles that appeared in the New Yorker, which she closes, "I know of no other magazine that does so much for the information on relevant public issues."
The last exchange of letters between the colleagues, collaborators and friends began with one from Shawn on November 11, 1972. Arendt was working on a piece titled, "Life of the Mind," for a series of lectures. Shawn asks if Arendt would consider letting the New Yorker publish them. He closes, "I can only wait to read, whether in manuscript or in print, what you have to say about Thinking, Willing and Judging. There is nothing else I know of at this moment that I look forward to as restlessly." She replies:
Your letter: I think we touched on the possibility intimate interconnection of being both greatly encouraged and very much frightened by the same event. For your letter was a kind of event, both encouraging and frightening. There are very few people whom I would really hate to disappoint, and you of course are one of them. I do my best, but whether that will be good enough… (November 20, 1972)
After Arendt's death in December, 1975, Mary McCarthy became the executor of her estate; it fell on McCarthy's shoulders to communicate with Shawn about running sections of Arendt's edited manuscript, The Life of the Mind. In her letters, she explains the difficulties she had in taking over this project, as well as her communications with Harcourt, who was set to publish the book.  
It is evident that Shawn valued Arendt's contributions to, and comments on, the New Yorker; their important collaboration is reflected in this correspondence.
Inventory:
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 8-11-60.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 4-15-61, one leaf of Israeli Aerogramme.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 9-13-62, one leaf of Hannah Arendt letterhead.
English translation of accompanying German article on four leaves of yellow paper, with three pink slips.
ALS, "Miss Feldman" to WS, n.d., two leaves of Americana of New York letterhead, with pink slip.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 9-30-62, one leaf of Hannah Arendt letterhead with two leaves of manuscript with autographed notes attached.  
TLS, Ch. Finkelstein to Philip Perl, 10-24-62, one leaf of Yivo Institute for Jewish Research letterhead.
Typed manuscript entitled "Note on Prosecution Witnesses" with autograph notes, two copies on one leaf of yellow paper each.  To do list attached, typed on one leaf of yellow paper, as well as a final proof of a New Yorker article typed with autograph notes back, 4-3-63.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 11-21-62, one leaf of Welseyan University letterhead.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 2-16-63, one leaf of Hannah Arendt letterhead.
Typed Memorandum Xeroxed, ADL Regional Offices to Arnold Forster, 3-11-63, three leaves of Anti Defamation League of B'Nai B'Rith letterhead.
TLC, uncredited to Bill, 3-11-63.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 3-13-63, one leaf of Hotel Krafft am Rhein, Basel letterhead.
Typed Memorandum Xeroxed, ADL Regional Offices to Arnold Forster, 3-27-63, four leaves of Anti Defamation League of B'Nai B'Rith letterhead, with attached typed article "during the week…as I see it" by Leo Mindlin, from "The Jewish Floridian", 3-15-63, three leaves.
TLS, "Maury [Maurice Feldman]" to WS, 4-2-63, one leaf of Maurice Feldman letterhead, with London Times article attached, one leaf.
TLX, Hannah Arendt to unknown recipient, 4-10-63.
TLS, "Rabbi Philip S. Bernstein" to WS, 5-3-63, one leaf of Barbizon-Plaza Hotel letterhead, with four leaves of TLC attachment enclosed for consideration as a letter to the New Yorker.
TLX, "Samuel D. Freeman" to [unknown], 5-24-63, one leaf of Jewish Center Lecture Bureau letterhead.
TL, WS to Rabbi Philip S. Bernstein, 6-28-63, one leaf of yellow paper.  
TLX. "Jonas Turkow" to The New Yorker Editor's Office, 6-28-63, two leaves of Warsaw Ghetto Resistance Organization letterhead.
TLS, Jules I. Whitman to The New Yorker Managing Editor, 8-7-63, one leaf of Dilworth, Paxson, Kalish, Kohn and Dilks letterhead, with accompanying envelope attached.
TLS, "Theodore Kollek" to WS, 9-18-63, one leaf of the Israeli Prime Minister's Office letterhead, with referenced two leaf article from July-Aug 1963 issue of "FACTS" entitled "A Report on the Evil of Banality: The Arendt Book".
TL, Samuel Grafton to Hannah Arendt, 9-19-63, three leaves, with reply: TL, Hannah Arendt to Samuel Grafton, 9-20-63, with one pink note.
TL Draft, [unknown] to Samuel Grafton, n.d., thirteen leaves, with autographed notes.  
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 6-8-64, one leaf of Hannah Arendt letterhead.
TL, WS to Hannah Arendt, 6-25-64.
Xerox copy of typed manuscript with autographed notes, by Hannah Arendt, "Note to the Reader" and "Postscript" additions for a new edition of her book, 28 leaves.
TL, WS to Hannah Arendt, 7-14-64.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 3-28-65, one leaf of Hannah Arendt letterhead.
TL, Hannah Arendt to [WS], 4-6-65.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 4-14-65, one leaf of University of Chicago letterhead, with autographed note.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 7-28-65, one leaf of Hannah Arendt letterhead (double sided),
TL, WS to Hannah Arendt, 8-24-65, one leaf of RCA International Telegram.
TL, WS to Hannah Arendt, 10-14-65.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 11-14-65, one leaf of Hannah Arendt letterhead.
TL, WS to Hannah Arendt, 11-17-65, with xeroxed copy of typed manuscript with autographed notes, 19 pages.  
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 12-5-65, one leaf of Hannah Arendt letterhead.
TLS, "[unknown]" to Hannah Arendt, 3-31-66, one leaf of Temple Emanu-El letterhead.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 7-6-66, one leaf of University of Chicago letterhead, with autographed note.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 7-25-66, one leaf of Hannah Arendt letterhead.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 8-30-66, one leaf of Hannah Arendt letterhead.
TL (copy), Peter Laslett to Hannah Arendt, n.d.
TL, WS to Hannah Arendt, 10-12-66.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 10-13-66, one leaf of Hannah Arendt letterhead.
TN, Marlene Mandel to unknown, n.d., regarding publication of  Arendt's essay "Truth and Politics" in the New Yorker (?).
TN, Mason to WS, 12-29-68, summary of "Reflections" purchase details.
Article "Hannah Arendt est~elle nazie?" from "Le Nouvel Observator", 10-26-66, 2 leaves.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 2-11-68, one leaf of Hannah Arendt memo paper.
TLC, WS to Hannah Arendt, 3-8-68.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 9-23-68, one leaf of New School for Social Research letterhead.
TLC, WS to Hannah Arendt, 10-25-68.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 12-5-69, one leaf of Hannah Arendt memo paper.
TLC, [WS] to Hannah Arendt, 12-15-69.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 4-7-69, one leaf of New School for Social Research letterhead.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 4-19-69, one lead of New School for Social Research letterhead.
TLX, "Hannah Arendt" to Henry Raymont, 3-30-70, two leaves of New School for Social Research letterhead, with "Brecht's Politics Stirring Scholars Anew" article from 3-8-70 New York Times.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 4-25-70, one leaf of New School for Social Research letterhead.
TLX, "Diane Neustadter" to Milton Greenstein, 7-1-70, one leaf of Simon and Schuster letterhead.
TL, WS to Hannah Arendt, 7-20-70, one leaf of RCA Global Telegram.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 4-28-70, one leaf of New School for Social Research letterhead.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 7-23-70.
TLC, WS to Hannah Arendt, 8-21-70.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 8-26-70, one leaf of Hannah Arendt memo paper.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 6-26-72, one leaf of Hannah Arendt memo paper.
TLC, WS to Hannah Arendt, 8-10-72.
TLC, WS to Hannah Arendt, 11-11?-72.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 11-20-72, one leaf of New School for Social Research letterhead.
TLX, Rita Vaughan memo, 7-23-74.
TLS, "Rita Vaughan" to WS, 5-10-76, one leaf of Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc. letterhead.
TLS, "Mary McCarthy" to WS, 9-22-76, two leaves of blue memo paper.
TLS, "Rita Vaughan" to WS, 10-1-76, one leaf of Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc. letterhead.
TLS, "Rita Vaughan" to WS, 12-14-76, one leaf of Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc. letterhead.
TLS, "Rita Vaughan" to WS, 2-28-77, one leaf of Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc. letterhead.
TN, WS to Lotte Kohler, 3-2-77, one leaf of New Yorker memo paper.
TLS, "Mary" to WS, 3-25-77, one leaf of blue memo paper.  
TLC, WS to Rita Vaughan, 4-4-77.
TLC, WS to Lotte Kohler, 6-1-77.
TLS, "Rita Vaughan" to WS, 6-9-77, one leaf of Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc. letterhead.
TLC, WS to Rita Vaughan, 6-29-77.
TLC, WS to Mary McCarthy, 7-21-77, two leaves, with Xeroxed copy.
TLX, "Mary" to WS, 8-8-77, two leaves, two copies.
TLX, "Mary" to WS, 8-10-77, three leaves, two copies.
TLS, "Lotte Kohler" to Mrs. Painter at the New Yorker, 8-18-77.
TLX, "Mary" to WS, 8-22-77, three leaves, two copies.  
TLX, "Mary" to WS, 9-27-77.
TLC, [WS?] to Mary McCarthy, 9-30-77, with Xeroxed copy and xexox copy of TL, "Mary" to WS, 9-27-77.
TLS, "Mary" to WS, 11-18-77, two leaves, with copy.
TLX, WS to Mary McCarthy, 10-10-77, with TLX, "Mary" to WS, 10-18-77.
TLS, "Mary" to WS, 12-5-77, one leaf of blue memo paper.
TLC, Elizabeth Macklin to Ernst Fuerst, 12-16-77.
TLC, WS to William Jovanovich, 4-24-78.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 4-14-65, one leaf of University of Chicago letterhead, with autographed note.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 7-28-65, one leaf of Hannah Arendt letterhead (double sided),
TL, WS to Hannah Arendt, 8-24-65, one leaf of RCA International Telegram.
TL, WS to Hannah Arendt, 10-14-65.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 11-14-65, one leaf of Hannah Arendt letterhead.
TL, WS to Hannah Arendt, 11-17-65, with xeroxed copy of typed manuscript with autographed notes, 19 pages.  
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 12-5-65, one leaf of Hannah Arendt letterhead.
TLS, "[unknown]" to Hannah Arendt, 3-31-66, one leaf of Temple Emanu-El letterhead.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 7-6-66, one leaf of University of Chicago letterhead, with autographed note.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 7-25-66, one leaf of Hannah Arendt letterhead.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 8-30-66, one leaf of Hannah Arendt letterhead.
TL (copy), Peter Laslett to Hannah Arendt, n.d.
TL, WS to Hannah Arendt, 10-12-66.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 10-13-66, one leaf of Hannah Arendt letterhead.
TN, Marlene Mandel to unknown, n.d., regarding publication of Arendt's essay "Truth and Politics" in the New Yorker (?).
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 1-24-67, one leaf of Hannah Arendt letterhead, with autograph note.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 7-21-67, one leaf of Hannah Arendt letterhead.  
TL, [WS] to Hannah Arendt, 8-11-67.
TLC, WS to Hannah Arendt, 10-2-67, two leaves.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 11-21-67, one leaf of Hannah Arendt letterhead.
TN, Mason to WS, 1-29-68.
French newspaper article "Hannah Arendt est~elle nazie?", 10-26-66, two leaves of yellow newspaper.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 2-11-68, one leaf of Hannah Arendt memo paper.
TL, WS to Hannah Arendt, 3-8-68.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 9-23-68, one leaf of New School for Social Research letterhead.
TLC, WS to Hannah Arendt, 10-25-68.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 4-7-69, one leaf of New School for Social Research letterhead.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 4-19-69, one leaf of New School for Social Research letterhead.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 12-5-69, one leaf of Hannah Arendt memo paper.
TLC, [WS] to Hannah Arendt, 12-15-69.
TLX, "Hannah Arendt" to Henry Raymont, 3-30-70, two leaves of New School for Social Research letterhead, with autograph notes and accompanying articles "Brecht's Politics Stirring Scholars Anew; 1. Briton Calls Essay by Arendt faulty and 2. Dramatists praise of Stalin in Dispute" (the latter by Mr. Raymont), from the New York Times, 3-28-70, one leaf of yellow newspaper.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 4-25-70, one leaf of The New School for Social Research letterhead.
TLX, "Diane Neustadter" to Milton Greenstein, 7-1-70, one leaf of Simon and Schuster letterhead.
TL, WS to Hannah Arendt, 7-20-70, one leaf of RCA Global Telegram.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 4-28-70, one leaf of New School for Social Research letterhead.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 7-23-70, with autograph notes.
TLC, WS to Hannah Arendt, 8-21-70.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 8-26-70, on leaf of Hannah Arendt memo paper.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 6-26-72, one leaf of Hannah Arendt memo paper.
TLC, WS to Hannah Arendt, 8-10-72.
TLC, WS to Hannah Arendt, 11-11?-72.
TLS, "Hannah Arendt" to WS, 11-20-72, one leaf of New School for Social Research letterhead.
TNX, Rita Vaughan to [unknown], 7-23-74.
TLS, "Rita Vaughan" to WS, 5-10-76, one leaf of Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc. letterhead.
TLS, "Mary McCarthy" to WS, 9-22-76, two leaves of blue memo paper.  
TLS, "Rita Vaughan" to WS, 10-1-76, one leaf of Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc. letterhead.
TLS, "Rita Vaughan" to WS, 12-14-76, one leaf of Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc. letterhead.
TLS, "Rita Vaughan" to WS, 2-28-77, one leaf of Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc. letterhead.
TN, WS to Lotte Kohler, 3-2-77, one leaf of The New Yorker memo paper.
TLS, "Mary" [McCarthy] to Bill [WS], 3-25-77, one leaf of blue memo paper.  
TL, WS to Rita Vaughan, 4-4-77.
TL, WS to Lotte Kohler, 6-1-77.
TLS, "Rita Vaughan" to WS, 6-9-77, on leaf of Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc. letterhead.
TLC, WS to Rita Vaughan, 6-29-77.
TLC, WS to Mary McCarthy, 7-21-77, two sheets, with Xerox copy.
TLX, "Mary" [McCarthy] to Bill [WS], 8-8-77, two leaves, two copies.  
TLX, "Mary" [McCarthy] to Bill [WS], 8-10-77, three leaves, two copies.
TLS, "Lotte Kohler" to Mrs. Painter, 8-18-77.
TLX, "Mary" [McCarthy] to Bill [WS], 8-22-77, three leaves, two copies.
TLX, "Mary [McCarthy] to Bill [WS], 9-27-77.
TLC, [WS] to Mary McCarthy, 9-30-77, with Xeroxed copy and TLX, "Mary [McCarthy] to Bill [WS], 10-8-77.
TLS, "Mary [McCarthy] to Bill [WS], 11-18-77, two leaves, two copies both with original signature.
TLX, WS to Mary McCarthy, 10-10-77, with TLX, "Mary [McCarthy] to Bill [WS], 10-18-77.
TLS, "Mary [McCarthy] to Bill [WS], 12-5-77, one leaf of blue memo paper.
TLC, Elizabeth Macklin to Ernst Fuerst, 12-16-77.
TLC, WS to William Jovanovich, 4-24-78.
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