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Labor] Pidgeon, Mary-Elizabeth.

Women Workers and their Dependents.

Book

Department Of Labor, Women's Bureau
1932-1957
Fourteenth Annual Report of the Director of the Women's Bureau. Fiscal year ended June 30, 1932. Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office, 1932.
8vo.; green printed wrappers; some creasing to pages.
Boxed together with:
Best, Ethel L. Piecework in the Silk-Dress Industry. Earnings, Hours, and Production. Bulletin of the Women's Bureau, No. 141. Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office, 1936.
8vo.; green printed wrappers, stapled.
Boxed together with:
Nyswander, Rachel Fesler and Janet M. Hooks. Employment of Women in the Federal Government 1923-1939. Bulletin of the Women's Bureau, No. 182. Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office, 1941.
8vo.; black and white illustrated wrappers, stapled.
Boxed together with:
Standards for Employment of Women. Recommended by the Women's Bureau. United States Department of Labor. Leaflet No.1. Washington, D.C.: N.P., but "for sale by the Superintendent of Documents," 1946.
8vo.;  folded leaflet; eight panels of text and graphics; printed in blue, black, and white.
Boxed together with:
Women's Stake in Unions. Collective bargaining; rate for the job; job security; better working conditions. Union Series No. 5. U.S. Department of Labor Women's Bureau. (Washington, D.C: United States Government Printing Office), 1946.
8vo.; folded leaflet; six panels of text and graphics; printed in black and red.
Boxed together with:
Hooks, Janet M. Women's Occupations through Seven Decades. Women's Bureau Bulletin, no. 218. Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office, 1947.
8vo.; beige printed wrappers, stapled.
Boxed together with:
Handbook of Facts on Women Workers. Bulletin of the Women's Bureau, No. 225. (Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office, 1948).
8vo.; green wrappers, stapled; printed in white; spine lightly rubbed; small defect on front wrapper.
Boxed together with:
Women's Jobs. Advance and Growth. Bulletin of the Women's Bureau, No. 232. (Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office, 1949).
8vo.; black and white photographs of women at work throughout; page lightly foxed; blue and white photographically illustrated wrappers.
Boxed together with:
Pidgeon, Mary-Elizabeth. Women Workers and Their Dependents. Bulletin of the Women's Bureau, No. 239. Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office, 1952.
8vo.; blue wrappers, stapled; printed in white; spine rubbed.
This representative collection of pamphlets issued by the Women's Bureau spans fifteen years and covers a range of topics relating to women in the workplace, such as the inclusion of women in labor unions, statistical data concerning the gender-wage gap, and nationwide comparisons of various occupational opportunities for women.
The Women's Bureau was created by Congress in 1920 and to this day remains the only government agency federally mandated to represent the interests of wage-earning women in the formation of public policy. Since 1920, the Women's Bureau has dedicated its energies to compiling important research and commissioning studies that provide the information necessary to legislatures at the local, state, and federal level. Among the notable examples of progress made by the Women's Bureau are the inclusion of women under the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 and the passage of the Equal Pay Act of 1963. In more recent years, the Women's Bureau has turned its attention to issues such as employer-sponsored childcare, and in 1993 it helped to ensure passage of the Family and Medical Leave Act. According the U.S. Department of Labor, the agency has the same mission now as it did back in 1920-to identify "the issues working women care about and vigorously pioneer research and remedies to address them"-and while the agency has proudly spearheaded many efforts to protect the rights of women employees, credit must also be given to the true "champions of working women: ... employers who recognize that women's work makes the world work" and most importantly, to the women workers themselves (http://www.dol.gov/
wb/info_about_wb/interwb.htm).  
(#5499 / #5509 / #5507 / #5503 / #5504 / #5515 / #7367 / #5513 / #5512)

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